What is this thing called 9Stucks?
9Stucks is a dynamic business diagnostic tool. It identifies nine distinct yet interrelated business challenges that cause a company to underperform.

‘You’ve Become One of Them’ – Fifteen Rules for Directors

director photoNote: This was originally published in the March 2015 issue of Private Company Director Magazine. Reprinted with permission of the editors.

“You’ve become one of them.” That’s what a fellow Director (“MoneyGuy”) said to me after one of XYZ Company’s regular board meetings. MoneyGuy was from XYZ’s lead investor group and the majority shareholder. The ’them’ MoneyGuy was speaking about was XYZ’s management team. From his tone, I knew MoneyGuy wasn’t giving me a compliment; I was being admonished because I ‘sided with management’ about a particular matter that was pivotal to the future of the company.

What had I done wrong? To find the answer, you’ll need to read the following fifteen “rules” on how to work with owners.

These rules apply to different ownership structures of private companies. In general, the shareholders in private companies are either families, private equity/venture capital groups, management/founders, or a combination of these. The rules are indifferent to the stage of the company (early stage, mature, in decline, whatever). Hopefully you will see why these distinctions don’t alter how I work with owners.

Here are my fifteen rules:

1. Remember your role as a fiduciary. MoneyGuy knew I had a fiduciary responsibility to the corporation, not just to him and his private equity firm. They put me on the Board to be ‘an outside, independent voice.’ Somehow that slipped his mind! This brings me to Rule #2…

2. Don’t be a rubber stamp. You can get rubber stamps at Staples. MoneyGuy or any other majority shareholder should realize that you are not on the Board just to be another automatic vote for them. Another Director friend told me: “There is a fine line to walk as an independent director when those sitting around the table own the company and you are effectively their invited guest.” If management knows you are truly independent and not there to throw them under the bus, this will help build trust with all.

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What is this thing called 9Stucks?
9Stucks is a dynamic business diagnostic tool. It identifies nine distinct yet interrelated business challenges that cause a company to underperform.

Eeeek! Invasion of the Culture Snatchers

watch for snakes

A CEO friend recently told me that he asked three people to leave his company over the last few months.  After they were terminated, there was a marked improvement in the overall morale and attitude of the other employees.

I had met these people in the past.  Of the three, two were rats and one was a snake. Rats and snakes can wreak havoc with your culture and your strategy.

Introducing The Creatures…

Corporate rats are different from corporate snakes; however, both can be found in all levels of any organization, from significant investors to the rank and file employees.

Rats are Enablers. Even though you may see one or two at a time, there are usually multiple rats living together, many hidden from sight, gnawing and chewing on your culture day in and day out.  If your company has rats, the situation has reached a stage where extermination can be difficult, but not impossible. Rats have a direct or indirect role in maintaining the status quo. If you are a change agent and are struggling to make your changes stick, perhaps your rat(s) are the ones resisting or blocking your efforts. Maybe they perceive you to be an intruder; the ‘locals’ don’t fancy having outsiders mess around with their culture.

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What is this thing called 9Stucks?
9Stucks is a dynamic business diagnostic tool. It identifies nine distinct yet interrelated business challenges that cause a company to underperform.

Your Company’s Spring Training: Who’s On 1st? Where’s What?

RedSoxI Don’t Know (wait…he’s on third). Major League Baseball’s Spring Training kicks into high gear this week. Red Sox position players reported on February 18th and today (Feb. 20th) is the team’s first full squad workout. The players know their positions. Some players are versatile and can rotate around the lineup; however, once they are all on the field and in position, there is no confusion about their roles and what’s expected of them.  That’s the way it should be. Clear responsibilities set by management and known by their teammates.

Can you state that your senior team and all your employees are clear about their roles and responsibilities? Abbott and Costello highlighted the frustration and tension when there is a lack of clarity about ‘Who’s on First’. Here’s a contemporary take on the skit:

Role clarity has a distinct impact on your company’s overall performance.

If that sounds like Business 101 common sense, then why is it that in many of the Stuck companies where I have worked, there is a great deal of organizational fuzziness and they are Stuck in the Slow Lane?

What causes role ambiguity?

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What is this thing called 9Stucks?
9Stucks is a dynamic business diagnostic tool. It identifies nine distinct yet interrelated business challenges that cause a company to underperform.

How Scrooge and Marley Became Unstuck

Scrooge and Marley PLC was stuck.

I don’t identify my clients by name, but given the widespread publicity and overall notoriety of this particular company, I felt it would be beneficial to reveal the real ‘story behind the story’. This is a case study about how Scrooge and Marley PLC became unstuck.

Background

Scrooge and Marley was a mature, privately-held ‘counting house’. The company was founded by Jacob Marley and Ebenezer Scrooge, two aggressive, entrepreneurial clerks. There were no outside investors and no cash awards from any business accelerator programs. (Hard to imagine who might have wanted to hear their elevator pitch!)

What is a ‘counting house’? Marley called their business a ‘money-changing hole’. It was a closely held, secretive financial institution that charged high interest rates on all transactions. They were loan sharks…predatory lenders operating out of a dingy warehouse. It’s a good thing their home office was in London, otherwise they probably would have been targeted by Dodd-Frank or The Consumer Finance Protection Bureau.

Jacob Marley died while he was still employed at the company. There was no key man life insurance; they were too cheap to buy a policy. After Marley’s death, Scrooge became the sole shareholder and he decided to run Scrooge and Marley as he saw fit.

Little did Scrooge know that Jacob decided to maintain a Board observer role.

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